Henry Weston Flesher Sr  ‎(I13)‎
Given Names: Henry Weston
Surname: Flesher
Suffix: Sr
   
Show Details Note: He immigrated on 2 Nov 1752 to Philadelphia, , PA. ship Phoenix, Captain was John Spurrier
He was a Shoemaker.
The town he died in was named Flesherville then renamed to Preston and another city was named Weston in 1819; both on his property.
He served in the Military during the Revolutionary War. Weston VA was named after him.



Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 12 November 1734 42 41 Ober-Seemen, Hessen-Darmstadt Germany
Death: 26 February 1803 ‎(Age 68)‎ Weston Lewis, West Virginia, USA
Personal Facts and Details
Notes

Note
Henry “Weston” Flesher ‎(1734 – 1803)‎ – Henry Flesher was born on November 12, 1734 in Ober-Seemen, Heese, Germany, the son of Balthasar and Anna ‎(Schmidt)‎ Fleischer. Henry immigrated to America with his older brother, Peter and family, arriving at the Port of Philadelphia on the ship “Phoenix” on November 2, 1752.‎[1]‎ Peter was a shoemaker by trade and had apparently taught his trade to his younger brother Henry. Once in America their name became Flesher. They moved to the German community that had been established on the South Branch of the Potomac River in what is now Pendleton County, West Virginia. Henry married Elizabeth Bush in 1759. They had twelve children. In 1776 he moved his young family west settling at the mouth of Stone Creek on the West Fork River in what is now Lewis County, West Virginia, acquiring 400 acres.

In 1781 frequent Indian attacks led Henry to take his family to Fort Buckhannon where they stayed until March, 1782, when they moved on to Fort Richards.
All of the adult men took their turn guarding and scouting.
Henry returned to his farm in 1784 ‎(present day Weston, West Virginia)‎.
In October, 1784, Henry had been hauling logs for a stable. On the way to his cabin to get a bell for his horse he was turning loose to graze in the woods, Indians fired upon Henry in an ambush.
Severely wounded by a ball passing through one of his arms, he managed to run to the cabin, pursued by a band of howling Indians. Others inside the cabin fired on the Indians as Elizabeth Flesher pulled her husband to safety.
The attackers then retreated. Fearing a renewal of the attack, the family fled to the woods where Edward Hughes found them and led them to the West Fork.
In 1786 he obtained title to an additional 400 acres of land. Henry died in February, 1803, in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Elizabeth died in 1807 in Weston.

Some Records show his name as: Heinrich Weston Flesher
Birthdate: November 12, 1734
Birthplace: Ober-Seemen, Landgrafschaft Hessen-Darmstadt, Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation
Death: November 26, 1802 in Clarksburg, Harrison County, Virginia, United States

Occupation: Shoemaker, soldier in Rev. War, farmer, Revolutinary War Vet, Scout, settled area of Weston, VA‎(WV)‎/Shoemaker by trade

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Burial

Despite his profile in FindAGrave, his place of burial is unknown. Find A Grave Memorial# 87685362

Trained as a shoemaker in Germany.

Emigrated to America aboard the ship "Phoenix" with his older brother Peter and his brother's family, arriving in Philadelphia on 11/2/1752.

Birth and marriage locations for Henry and Elizabeth from the diary of Andrew Jackson Flesher.
Naturalized in Augusta Co VA in 1770.
Henry settled what came to be called Flesherville but son Henry Jr refused to have anything to do with the new town's name, and it was then called Preston WV.
The city of Weston WV was also established on Henry's land, in 1818.

Rev. War: an ensign. Neighbor of Jesse Hughes the Indian fighter

Will dated Nov 26 1802 and recorded in Harrison Co VA‎(WV)‎, written in German

m. Elizabeth Bush b. abt Feb 20 1747/48 VA, d. 1807

_________________________________________

Peter Fleischer was a shoemaker by trade and had apparently taught his trade to his younger brother Henry.
Once in America their name became Flesher.
They moved to the German community that had been established on the South Branch of the Potomac River in what is now Pendleton County, West Virginia.
Henry married Elizabeth Bush in 1759. They had twelve children.
In 1776 he moved his young family west, settling at the mouth of Stone Creek on the West Fork River in what is now Lewis County, West Virginia, acquiring 400 acres.

In 1781, frequent Indian attacks led Henry to take his family to Fort Buckhannon where they stayed until March, 1782, when they moved on to Fort Richards. All of the adult men took their turn guarding and scouting. Henry returned to his farm in 1784 ‎(present day Weston, West Virginia. In October, 1784, Henry had been hauling logs for a stable. On the way to his cabin to get a bell for his horse that he was turning loose to graze in the woods, Indians fired upon Henry in an ambush. Severely wounded by a ball passing through one of his arms, he managed to run to the cabin, pursued by a band of howling Indians. Others inside the cabin fired on the Indians as Elizabeth Flesher pulled her husband to safety. The attackers then retreated. Fearing a renewal of the attack, the family fled to the woods where Edward Hughes found them and led them to the West Fork.

In 1786 Henry obtained title to an additional 400 acres of land. Henry died in February, 1803, in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Elizabeth died in 1807 in Weston.

--------------------

Henry “Weston” Flesher (1734 – 1803)‎ – Henry Flesher was born on November 12, 1734 in Ober-Seemen, Heese, Germany, the son of Balthasar and Anna ‎(Schmidt)‎ Fleischer. Henry immigrated to America with his older brother, Peter and family, arriving at the Port of Philadelphia on the ship “Phoenix” on November 2, 1752.‎[1]‎ Peter was a shoemaker by trade and had apparently taught his trade to his younger brother Henry. Once in America their name became Flesher. They moved to the German community that had been established on the South Branch of the Potomac River in what is now Pendleton County, West Virginia. Henry married Elizabeth Bush in 1759. They had twelve children. In 1776 he moved his young family west settling at the mouth of Stone Creek on the West Fork River in what is now Lewis County, West Virginia, acquiring 400 acres.

In 1781 frequent Indian attacks led Henry to take his family to Fort Buckhannon where they stayed until March, 1782, when they moved on to Fort Richards. All of the adult men took their turn guarding and scouting. Henry returned to his farm in 1784 ‎(present day Weston, West Virginia[2]‎). In October, 1784, Henry had been hauling logs for a stable. On the way to his cabin to get a bell for his horse he was turning loose to graze in the woods, Indians fired upon Henry in an ambush. Severely wounded by a ball passing through one of his arms, he managed to run to the cabin, pursued by a band of howling Indians. Others inside the cabin fired on the Indians as Elizabeth Flesher pulled her husband to safety. The attackers then retreated. Fearing a renewal of the attack, the family fled to the woods where Edward Hughes found them and led them to the West Fork. In 1786 he obtained title to an additional 400 acres of land. Henry died in February, 1803, in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Elizabeth died in 1807 in Weston.‎[3]‎

‎[1]‎ Passenger List the ship Phoenix, 1752, ship Captain was John Spurrier

‎[2]‎ The town of Weston was briefly named Flesherville in 1819 before the name was changed to Weston.

‎[3]‎ "Flesher Family History in America", Thomas R. Flesher, 1999

­http­://­www­.­krepps­.­net­/­henrywestonflesher­.­htm­

________________________________________

* Henry Flesher b. 1734 Germany, d. 1802 Clarksburg VA‎(WV)‎ aka Heinrich Fleisher, he was a educated as a shoemaker in Germany.

Birth and marriage locations for Henry and Elizabeth from the diary of Andrew Jackson Flesher. Naturalized in Augusta Co VA in 1770. Henry settled what came to be called Flesherville but son Henry Jr refused to have anything to do with the new towns name, and it was then called Preston WV. The city of Weston WV was also established on Henry's land, in 1818. Rev. War: an ensign. Neighbor of Jesse Hughes the Indian fighter Will dated Nov 26 1802 and recorded in Harrison Co VA ‎(WV)‎, written in German

­http­://­www­.­rootsweb­.­ancestry­.­com­/~­deschart­/­z0000056­.­html­

-------------------- Peter and Heinrich Fleischer, along with Peter’s family, arrived in Philadelphia on the Phoenix in November of 1752. The first thing the new immigrants were required to do upon arrival was to swear an oath of allegiance to the British Crown. David Armstrong tells us that the Pennsylvania Gazette reported that the new immigrants “took their oaths before one Edward Shippen, Esq.” It was then customary that several days after arrival new immigrants were expected to go to the court house in Philadelphia where they swore an “oath of abjuration”. This was a public declaration that the Pope had no right to appoint a ruling monarch of England.

So, what was this Philadelphia like when Peter and Heinrich Fleischer arrived on the Phoenix in November of 1752 and first walked its streets? Benjamin Franklin, in his autobiography, tells us he arrived in Philadelphia as a young man in 1723. Benjamin had long been a prominent printer and respected citizen when the Phoenix arrived. We learn that Walnut, Chestnut and Locust Streets had long been laid out, but it would be four more years before Franklin could convince his fellow townsmen the streets should be paved. As Peter and Heinrich trod the dusty streets to the court house to take their oath of abjuration they were probably unaware that Franklin had just been “appointed postmaster general by a commission from the postmaster general in England” with a sum of six hundred pounds a year.

Once in the New World, Heinrich and Peter Fleischer became Henry and Peter Flesher. We know nothing for sure about the whereabouts of young bachelor Henry and older brother Peter and his family, until they turned up on the South Branch of the Potomac River in what is now Pendleton County, WV, about 1759.

However, one can speculate. It would seem natural that they would have first gone to Germantown, Pa. to be with their cousins Agnes and Balthasar and other acquaintances from their home village of Oberseemen until they got the lay of the land. The French and Indian War was in full bloom with continuous Indian raids making the western frontier unsafe.

Peter and Henry surely learned that there were alluring but dangerous trails leading to the west. These were the trails of the Delaware, Iroquois and Shawnee, who, ever since the invasion of the white race, were fleeing to the wilderness beyond the mountain ranges. These trails had various branches, some of which cut through the mountain gaps and intersected the paths leading to the fording places on the Susquehanna, the Juniata, the West Branch and the upper Allegheny.

Before the white man invaded this forest enshrouded wilderness, these winding Indian paths were the only trails through the tree-covered valleys and over the rugged mountains. Following the Indians over these same trails came the traders carrying their merchandise to the Indian villages on the Ohio, Allegheny, Beaver and even to the Muskingum and Scioto valleys, where they bartered their goods for the furs and pelts of the Indian hunters. When the white settlers went westward into the great wilderness to build their log cabins these same trader and Indian trails became the roadways which they traveled. Later, when the struggle for the possession of the great western empire west of the mountains commenced between France and Great Britain, these trails became the military roads, over which the armies of Braddock and Forbes cut their way. By 1758 William Pitt had become British Prime Minister of England and he pushed for the final defeat of the French in North America. His grand plan for the English forces included the capture of Louisbourg, Forts Ticonderoga and Duquesne, with the final target: Quebec.

Throughout the fall of 1758, the British had been preparing for an assault on Fort Duquesne. Brigadier General John Forbes assembled five thousand colonials and fifteen hundred Highlanders at Fort Cumberland, Virginia. His second-in-command, Lieutenant Colonel Henry Bouquet, was a Swiss mercenary, a professional soldier serving in the Royal Americans who would soon be recognized as one of the finest Indian fighters in America. Colonel George Washington led the Virginia regiment. On this, his third visit to the Ohio country, Washington hoped to see the end of the French fort. The attack on Fort Duquesne was successfully concluded in November 1758.

With the fall of the fort and the subsequent curtailment of Indian raids, a feeling of safety prevailed which led to further colonization. It was shortly thereafter, about 1759, when we find the two brothers, Henry and Peter, turning up on the South Branch of the Potomac river in what is now Pendleton County, WV. They moved into the German community there which had been established in the 1740’s. George Washington had visited that community in 1748 and described it thus: “‎(we were)‎ attended by a great company of people...that attended us through the woods...showing us their antic tricks. I...think they seemed to be as ignorant a set of people as the Indians . They would never speak English but when spoken to they speak all Dutch.”

The French attitude towards the Indians had always been more conciliatory than that of the English. French Jesuit priests and traders had maintained friendly and generous dealings with their Indians neighbors. However, after the fall of Fort Duquesne, the British drove the French off the land and ended the French custom of giving presents to the Indians. The victorious British aroused resentment of the Western tribes by treating them arrogantly, building forts and permitting white settlement on Indian-owned lands. This treatment of the Indians led to what became known as Pontiac's Rebellion ‎(1763-66)‎.

The Ottawa under their chief Pontiac, together with the Shawnees, Delawares, and other tribes overran the British forts and harassed frontiersmen and their families during the harvest, scalping and killing many. Western parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia were kept in a state of terror but the Indians failed to seize British forts at Detroit and Fort Pitt ‎(now Pittsburgh)‎. Finally, successful campaigns in Pennsylvania under Col. Bouquet forced the Delaware and Shawnee to sue for peace and a treaty was concluded with them. Without the support of his strongest allies, Pontiac signed a peace treaty in 1766 and was pardoned.

Throughout this period, Peter and Henry appear to have remained in the German community on the South Branch of the Potomac river. It appears Peter Flesher found contentment there and remained in Pendelton County raising a large family. Henry, who married Elizabeth Bush about 1759, also remained on the South Branch of the Potomac for about eight years. Seven of his children were born here, four daughters and three sons, including my ancestor Andrew in 1771. According to records turned up by Walter Farwell, Henry was practicing the shoemaker trade and entered a claim of 50 acres on Canoe Run, a branch of the South Fork of the Potomac in 1770.

Further to the west along the Ohio Valley, white encroachment on Indian lands in the 1760’s and 70’, led to increased disputes between Indians and settlers. Then, at Yellow Creek in April of 1774, the unprovoked massacre of the family of one of the renowned Indian leaders, known as Logan, by Jacob Greathouse brought open warfare. Logan who had been known as the “white man’s friend”, now became the relentless seeker of revenge: his scalp-hunting raids spread panic along the whole frontier. Settlement of the area around Jane Lew on Hackers Creek1 had been made around 1770, but as a result the unrest along the frontier, the settlers of Hackers Creek took refuge by returning to the South Branch on the eastern side of the Alleghenys.

In 1774, Lord Dunmore, the governor of Virginia, put together a force to quell these attacks in what came to be known as Dunmore’s War. In November of 1774 the Shawnees attacked the forces consisting of 800 men, mostly well armed woodsmen, under the command of Col. Lewis at Point Pleasant on the Ohio ‎(near present day Ripley, WV)‎. The Shawnees were repulsed and defeated. Meanwhile, Lord Dunmore who had been carrying out operations further to the north had concluded peace with the tribes there. He sent word to Lewis to discontinue his pursuit and planned attack on the Indian villages across the Ohio. With the conclusion of peace, the army began to return home in little companies.

With the pacification of the frontier, the settlers who had taken refuge on the South Branch returned to Hackers Creek in 1776. Henry must have become restless seeing the other settlers moving west. So he took his young family and joined them, settling at the mouth of Stone Creek on the West Fork River in what is now Lewis County, West Virginia.

Due to an act passed in May 1779 by the general assembly of Virginia we have an exact description of Henry’s claim. The act “...entitling all persons who had by January 1, 1778, settled on these western waters, four hundred acres of land, or such smaller quantity as the party may choose... to include the settlers improvements.” Accordingly, a commissioners office was set up in Clarksburg in April, 1781 before which Henry Flesher appeared and was issued a certificate for “...400 acres at the mouth of Stone Coal creek to include his settlement made in 1776.” ‎(This paragraph paraphrases information published by Walter Farwell in his biographical Sketch of Henry Flesher dated July 1984. There is a map of the property set forth in Vol. 1, No. 1 of the Flesher Newsletter of 1990)‎

Ironically, the pacification of the Indians under Lord Dunmore’s leadership in 1775 was to be short-lived as the revolution would break out in 1776 and some of the very troops that had served under Dunmore’s command would now be fighting against him. And in a further ironical twist, the English, as a matter of policy during the Revolutionary War, would encourage the Indians, so recently pacified, to take up arms against the settlers! Oh! Perfidious Albion!

So life did not run smoothly for Henry and his family in their new home. Indian attacks on isolated pioneer settlements were a constant threat. It was therefore not uncommon for the families to take refuge from time to time in the nearby forts. But life went on. In 1777 son Henry, Jr. was born and the older children were growing up. Records indicate that daughter Anna, age 17, married John Sleeth while the family was living “in fort” in 1778.

Again in October, 1781, frequent Indian attacks led Henry to take his family to Fort Buckhannon where they stayed until it broke up in March of 1782 when they moved on to Fort Richards on the West Fork. Two members of the group were killed by Indians during this period: John Finch and Lt. White. Eighteen year old son Adam described life in Fort Richards thus:

“...From March 1782 to March 1783 and up to March 1784, I was engaged the summer and fall in cultivating corn, etc. Whilst some were working others were watching. I worked and watched alternately as others were. I was also out several times scouting and ranging in the woods...”

Mr. Farwell tells us, “That all adult men at Fort Richards had to take their turn at guarding, scouting, spying during their time at Fort, there can be little doubt. But this particular aspect of the Revolutionary War was not recognized under the 1832 pension act.” So there are no official records to show exactly what services Henry performed in the Revolutionary War.

In the spring of 1784 it appears Henry returned to his farm. A bit prematurely it seems. In October he gained notoriety when he was again forced to abandon his home after an attack by Indians. Early records of what is now Lewis County, WV record the following:

“It was just at the close of the Revolutionary War and the return of peace with England probably made some of the pioneers reckless as the attitude of the Indians was not yet certain. The pioneers could not foresee that a hard war was yet to be fought with Indians alone before General Wayne forced peace from the council of Greensville in 1795.

Henry’s encounter was the first in the war in that section of the frontier. It occurred about the middle of October 1784 at the spot later chosen as the Lewis County government seat. Henry had been engaged in hauling logs for a stable where the Baptist Church of Weston was erected. On his way to the cabin to get a bell for his horse which he was turning loose to graze in the woods, Henry was fired upon by Indians in ambush in the ravine which ran down the hill where Bank Street was later laid out. Severely wounded by a ball passing through one of his arms, he nevertheless managed to run to the cabin, pursued by a band of howling Indians. One was so close that when Henry was about to escape, swung his rifle at Henry. At such close quarters, the rifle struck the door frame above Henry’s head, which deflected the blow. Others inside the cabin fired on the Indians as Mrs. Flesher pulled her wounded husband to safety, and the attackers then retreated. Fearing a renewal of the attack, the family fled to the woods where Edward Hughes found them and led them to the West Fork.”

‎(At this point I would like to parenthetically note that this story of the Indian attack, while varying in some minor degrees, appears repeatedly in historical accounts of the time. See “Indian Attack” at the end of this section for a list that I have found so far.)‎

Henry was just one month shy of his 50th birthday when he was wounded in the Indian attack in 1784. Two years late, his son William was born. Somewhere along the line, Henry acquired an additional 400 acres of land just north of present day Weston from Alexander Maxwell. He had it surveyed and gained title to the property on 12 October 1786. His elder children were reaching maturity and getting married. Wedding bells were ringing in 1788: Elizabeth ‎(22)‎ married Francis Ligget on 19 August; Mary ‎(19)‎ married William Hannaman on 23 October.

At age 56, Henry was also preparing for his children’s future. On 18 April 1790 he deeded 232 acres of the Maxwell acquisition to his son Adam. However, life on the frontier was still a risky business. Adam Flesher’s military records show that he was active as a ranger and Indian spy in the war with the North Western tribes in 1791 and 1792. In 1792, Adam, who had been appointed corporal, was stationed at Flesher’s upper station ‎(located on present site of Weston)‎ with 8 men under his command. Their duty was to range the frontier country in order to discover or repel any hostile Indians intent upon attacking the frontier settlements. His brother-in-law, George Liggett, married to his sister Elizabeth, was killed by a small band of Shawnee Indians headed by the famous Tecumseh on 4 October 1791.

Nevertheless, life went on. Adam ‎(28)‎ found time to marry Elizabeth Staats, not yet sixteen, on 21 February 1792. A year later, younger brother Andrew ‎(22)‎, my direct ancestor, married Elizabeth Bibbee on 11 February 1793. Two months later, on 18 April 1793, Henry deeded the newlyweds the remaining 168 acres of the 400 acre Maxwell acquisition. Then on 28 June 1793 son Peter ‎(20)‎ married Mary Bonnett. Henry was 59.

Towards the end of Henry’s life, the frontier was beginning to quiet down. Under the command of General Anthony Wayne, the western tribes were subdued which culminated in the Peace Treaty of Greenville in August of 1795. This huge land grab by the young United States opened up the lands of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois.

The following year, his daughter Mary Flesher Sleeth, recently widowed at age 35, married Charles Parson on 30 April 1796. Shortly before, on 18 April 1796, Henry deeded his son Peter all the lands of the original claim which lay on the west side of West Fork. Henry’s retained the land on the east side where he had his home. There Henry remained until his death in February 1803 at age 68.

Henry Flesher’s claim was surveyed in 1786 and according to research done by Walter Farwell, the following survey record can be found in the courthouse in Clarksburg.

October 9th 1786 Surveyed for Henry Flesher 400 acres of Land in Harrison County, By virtue of a certificate in the right of Settlement granted by the Commissioners for adjusting the claims to unpatented Lands in the District of Monongalia, Yohogania, & Ohio Situated on both sides of the Westfork, including the mouths of Stonecoal & Polk Creeks, and including his settlement, & bounded as followeth viz-- BEGINNING at a Whiteoak near Flesher’s run and running Thence N.66 W. 60 Poles crossing said fork to a Whiteoak , thence up said fork S.60. W. 50 to a Whiteoak N.20 W.87 to a Poplar thence N.35 E76 to a Linn, N.5 W.64 to a Whiteoak, N.50 E.30 to a Whiteoak, S.39 E.40 to a Poplar, N.32 E.107 to a Whiteoak S.44 E.121 crossing said fork to a Hickory, S.80 E.80 to a Walnut tree S.31 E.160 crossing Stonecoal to a Buckeye Tree, S.79 W. 264 crossing said Flesher’s run to the beginning.

Edward Jackson Asst. to No Variations W. Raymond S.H.O.

Harrison County, West Virginia Survey Record Book No. 3 Page 35

Mr.Farwell goes on to state, “Henry Flesher made his home on this 400 acres, on the east side of the river. Smith’s 1920 “History of Lewis County”, on page 49 says:

“...Tradition states that his home was built near the present site of Whelan’s store, a few yards from the corner of First and Main; his barn stood near the corner of Center avenue and Second street; his threshing floor later occupied the site of the court house...” Henry’s house ‎(First & Main)‎; Henry’s barn ‎( Center & Second)‎

Indian Attack: Walter Farwell in his research and writings on The Flesher Family lists three versions in his Bio Sketch of Henry Flesher . 1.) Direct quotes from Andrew Flesher Jr. of Jackson County; 2.) John Flesher of Iroquois County, IL; 3.) 1911 History of Ritchie County, WV, pages 528-529.

He cites another version from Smith s A History of Lewis County 1920 page 73.

I understand that Hardesty’s 1883 Historical and Geographical Encyclopedia contains an account of The Shooting of Henry Flesher

The Transallegheny Historical Magazine , page 246 of Volume one confirms part of the account.

The Flesher Connection newsletter published Noah Flesher‘s Early History of Lewis County which it states was published in the Democrat issue of May 24 1834. ‎(Noah was grandson of Henry and son of Adam Flesher.)‎

Significant dates

Date Age Event 1734 Born in Ober-Seemen, Hesse, Germany ‎(11/12)‎

1752 18 Arr. in Phil. on Phoenix ‎(11/02)‎

1752-175? 18-24 Lived in PA

1758 24 Fall of Fort Duqesne ‎(November)‎

1758/9? 24-25 Moved near Hardy-Pendleton Co. line on South Branch of Potomac

1759 25 Married Elizabeth Bush

1761 27 Daughter Mary Anna Nancy born ‎(D 1846)‎

1763/66 29-32 Indian uprisings against British all along frontier

1764 30 Son Adam born 7/19 ‎(d. 1854)‎

1766 32 Daughter Elizabeth born ‎(d. 1843)‎

1768 34 Daughter Mary born 12/17 ‎(d. 1840)‎

1771 37 Son Andrew S. born 5/1 ‎(d.9/6/1850)‎

1773 39 Son Peter born ‎(d. 1814)‎

1774 40 Daughter Susanna born on South Branch

1774 Dunmore’s War 1774 July- Col Fields attacked on Kanawaha River 1774 Oct. Col Lewis engages in battle with Indians at Point Pleasant on the Ohio and routes them. Dunmore concludes peace with the tribes and calls off further attacks by Lewis. Western waters temporarily pacified

1776 42 Beginning of Revolutioary War: Henry moves family to “western waters” where present day Weston is located: settled . ..”400 acres at the mouth of Stone Coal” ‎(Ref page 14/15 Walter Farwell)‎

1777 43 Son Henry Jr. born ‎(d, 1840)‎

1778 44 Mary Anna, age 17, married John Sleeth “in Fort” ‎(Farwell page 37)‎

1781 47 Enters claim for 400 acres at Clarksburg

1781 47 Family went to Buckhannons Fort because of frequent Indian raids ‎(Farwell page 37)‎ Family lived in fort from October 1781 to March 1784 . They took turns standing guard while other group cultivated corn. Two members of group were killed by Indians during this period: John Finch & Lt. White. Son Adam served in scouting parties during this period. .

1782 48 Son John born ‎(d. 1866)‎

1782 48 March - Fort Buckhannon broke up and family moved to Fort Richards on the West Fork ‎(Farwell page 22)‎

1784 50 March - Left Fort Richrds and returned to farm

1784 50 October - Indian attack on Henry. Went to West’s Fort ‎(near present day Jane Lew)‎ and remained until start of winter ‎(Farwell page 24)‎

1786 52 Son William born ‎(d/1817)‎

12 October - Gets title to additional 400 acres obtasined from Alexander Maxwell

1788 54 4 Sep - Elizabeth married Francis Ligget

1788 54 23 Oct - Mary, age 19, married William Hannaman, age 25 ‎(b.3/1763- d. 9/1839 )‎

1790 56 15 Feb - deeded 232 acres of West Fork to Adam, age 26‎(Farwell page 39)‎

1791 57 Adam becomes ranger and Indian spy

1791 57 4 Nov - Geo. Ligget, b-in-law of Elizabeth mudered by small group of Shawnee headed by the famous Tecumseh ‎(Farwell page 39)‎

1792 58 21 Feb - Adam marries Elizabeth Staat

1793 59 21 Feb - Son Andrew, age 22, married Elizabeth Bibbee

1793 59 18 April - Deeded 168 Acres remaing Maxwell 400 to Andrew

1793 59 18 June - Son Peter, age 20, married Mary Bonnett

1795 61 August - Treaty of Greenville

1796 62 18 April - deeds to Peter all lands of original claim west side of West Fork. ‎( Henry’s home on east bank)‎

1796 62 30 April - Mary Anna Flesher Sleeth ‎(35)‎‎(widow)‎ marries Charles Parson

1802 68 26 November - Last will & testament: witnesses Paul S. Butcher & John Law

1803 68 February - Died

sourced from ­http­://­freepages­.­genealogy­.­rootsweb­.­com­/~­tomflesherswebsite­/­Part­%­20II­%­20America­%­21­.­html­

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Family with Parents
Father
Balthasar Fleischer ‎(I14)‎
Birth 16 August 1692 35 32 Hessen-Oberseemen, Hessen-Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany
Death 10 August 1755 ‎(Age 62)‎ Ober-Seemen, Hessen, Germany
4 months
Mother
 
Anna Schmidt ‎(I30)‎
Birth 6 December 1692 22 22 Hessen-Oberseemen Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany
Death 31 May 1763 ‎(Age 70)‎ Hessen-Oberseemen Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany

Marriage: 1759 -- Virginia, USA
-46 years
#1
Brother
Johan Heinrich Fleischer ‎(I660)‎
Birth 26 February 1713 20 20
Death  
8 years
#2
Brother
Johannes Peter Fleischer ‎(I31)‎
Birth 1 May 1721 28 28 Darmstadt, Stadtkreis Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany
Death 2 February 1801 ‎(Age 79)‎ Blue Grass, Highland County, Virginia, USA
-5 years
#3
Brother
Johann Casper Fleischer ‎(I661)‎
Birth 12 January 1716 23 23
Death 26 February 1716 ‎(Age 45 days)‎
3 years
#4
Sister
Agnes Fleischer ‎(I662)‎
Birth 24 December 1718 26 26
Death  
7 years
#5
Brother
Johann Phillip Fleischer ‎(I663)‎
Birth 12 August 1725 32 32
Death 1730 ‎(Age 4)‎
17 months
#6
Sister
Anna Catharina Fleischer ‎(I664)‎
Birth 13 January 1727 34 34
Death 1783 ‎(Age 55)‎
8 years
#7
Henry Weston Flesher Sr ‎(I13)‎
Birth 12 November 1734 42 41 Ober-Seemen, Hessen-Darmstadt Germany
Death 26 February 1803 ‎(Age 68)‎ Weston Lewis, West Virginia, USA
Family with Mary Elizabeth Zickafoose Bush
Henry Weston Flesher Sr ‎(I13)‎
Birth 12 November 1734 42 41 Ober-Seemen, Hessen-Darmstadt Germany
Death 26 February 1803 ‎(Age 68)‎ Weston Lewis, West Virginia, USA
5 years
Wife
 
Mary Elizabeth Zickafoose Bush ‎(I27)‎
Birth 20 February 1740 29 15 Hampshire County, WV
Death 1807 ‎(Age 66)‎ Weston, Lewis Co., WV

Marriage: 1759
3 years
#1
Son
Balser M. Flesher ‎(I706)‎
Birth 26 August 1761 26 21
Death 1833 ‎(Age 71)‎ Falls, Muskingum, Ohio
2 years
#2
Son (Birth)
Peter I Flesher ‎(I566)‎
Birth 3 November 1763 28 23 Lewis, Virginia, USA
Death 25 November 1814 ‎(Age 51)‎ Virginia, USA
9 months
#3
Son (Birth)
Adam J. Flesher ‎(I177)‎
Birth 29 July 1764 29 24 Virginia, USA
Death 4 November 1854 ‎(Age 90)‎ Lewis, Virginia, USA
17 months
#4
Daughter
Elizabeth Flesher ‎(I659)‎
Birth 1766 31 25
Death 4 April 1843 ‎(Age 77)‎
3 years
#5
Daughter
Mary Ann Flesher ‎(I54)‎
Birth 17 December 1768 34 28 S Branch Potomac
Death 1840 ‎(Age 71)‎ Jackson, Virginia, USA
2 years
#6
Son (Birth)
Andrew S. Flesher Sr ‎(I568)‎
Birth 1 May 1771 36 31 South Branch Potomac, Pendleton, West Virginia, USA
Death 6 September 1850 ‎(Age 79)‎ Jackson, West Virginia, USA
-10 years
#7
Daughter (Birth)
Anna Elizabeth Flesher ‎(I567)‎
Birth 1761 26 20 Pendleton, West Virginia, USA
Death 4 April 1850 ‎(Age 89)‎
14 years
#8
Daughter (Birth)
Susannah Flesher ‎(I569)‎
Birth 1775 40 34 Harrison Lewis, West Virginia, USA
Death 12 January 1851 ‎(Age 76)‎ Kanawha, West Virginia, USA
-2 years
#9
Son
Henry Flesher Jr ‎(I12)‎
Birth 1773 38 32 Hampshire County, Province of Virginia, West Virginia, USA
Death 1840 ‎(Age 67)‎ Clarksburg, Harrison County, Virginia, United States
10 years
#10
Son (Birth)
John Flesher ‎(I570)‎
Birth 22 August 1782 47 42 Harrison Lewis, West Virginia, USA
Death 23 March 1866 ‎(Age 83)‎ Virginia, USA
2 years
#11
Son (Birth)
William Flesher ‎(I571)‎
Birth 1785 50 44 Weston, Lewis, Virginia
Death 12 January 1817 ‎(Age 32)‎ Virginia, USA
26 years
#12
Daughter (Birth)
Catherine Ann Flesher ‎(I565)‎
Birth 1811 76 70 Lewis, West Virginia, USA
Death 9 July 1892 ‎(Age 81)‎ Lewis, West Virginia, USA